When You Believe…

sem·i·co·lon

ˈsemēˌkōlən,ˈsemīˌkōlən/

noun

a punctuation mark (;) indicating a pause, typically between two main clauses, that is more pronounced than that indicated by a comma.

Every tattoo on my body has some personal meaning to it. This is a marking that, unless I have it covered, I will bear for the rest of my life as a message to the world as to what I am about or was going through at the time. This is my newest addition.

As an mental health advocate and survivor of suicidal thoughts and depression I chose the word believe with a semicolon replacing the letter ‘i’.

This tattoo encourages me to bel;eve that things will be better and that this is not the end of my journey.

It’s one thing to just say aloud or to myself that even though times are hard that they will be better and things will be okay. It’s a total difference when you actually bel;eve that things will be better or different.

The bel;ef in a better way is what makes it happen. When you truly bel;eve that you will be okay, you will be. You have to bel;eve.

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National Diabetes Awareness Month

November marks national Diabetes Awareness month. As a type 1 diabetic, this is kind of a special month for me. Not only is thanksgiving one of my favorite holidays but I also get the chance to spread awareness about type 1 Diabetes and its affects on me and my fellow t1d’s.

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First, let’s dispel the myth of the look of a person with Diabetes. Not all diabetics are unhealthy people that didn’t eat correctly and/or exercise. I am a type 1 diabetic, so this is something that is an auto immune disorder that occurred naturally. My pancreas just decided to stop working. I am an avid runner and I’m all about healthy living. I didn’t create this because of my lifestyle choices.

Another myth is that I can’t have sugar. Umm… Without sugar I would die. My pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin aka glucose aka sugar to support and breakdown the food that I consume. While in the case of most type 2 diabetics, they may over produce insulin and yeah maybe they should stay away from the sugar because their body produces too much.

I stick myself at least 10-12 times per day to test my levels and that is on a light day. I test once when I wake up, before and after every meal and again before I go to sleep. I give myself an insulin shot in the morning on my long lasting/slow release insulin and a shot of my fast acting insulin before every meal. So imagine getting a flu shot at least three times a day everyday of your life. Not to mention the numb fingertips from the constant pricking to test my blood in the morning, before and after each meal, and whenever I feel a little out of whack.

This life is not easy. When you see a diabetic, especially a type 1 diabetic, hopefully you’ll understand a bit of what we go through. Oh and did I mention the carb/calorie counting and converting to units of insulin? Oh my gosh!! You need to be a mathematician to understand it all. We do what we have to do to stay alive and hopefully one day there will be a cure. Until then we just keep pushing.